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The U.S. Welcomes Modi, but Will Renewed Investment in India Follow?

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In his first visit to the U.S. as India’s prime minister, Narendra Modi sought to reinvigorate the business and political relationships between the two nations.

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The U.S. Welcomes Modi, but Will Renewed Investment in India Follow?

Posted by:

In his first visit to the U.S. as India’s prime minister, Narendra Modi sought to reinvigorate the business and political relationships between the two nations.

Continue Reading →

Each Employee’s Retirement Is Unique

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When people have been around a long time, you tend to take what they bring to the table for granted and you don’t realize what you lose until they go.

I remember the havoc raised by the retirement of our family company’s store manager in Piraeus. He was intimately familiar with every single one of our customers all over Greece, their distinctive preferences and whims. If it was a customer’s birthday you saw their name on the top of his daily ...

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Right-sizing Support Functions Part II

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Right-sizing support functions not only can cut costs – by 25% to 30% — it can also cut decision time by half.

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How to Deal with Bullies at Work

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You’ve got a difficult, manipulative boss or maybe an intensely competitive and rude colleague. Is it bullying, bad manners, or merely the normal competition of a workplace?

Healthy competition and even some aggression can make for a creative work environment where people push one another to better performance. But a bully can destroy a victim’s core sense of self, and limit their ability to be productive.

So how do you identify what is at work in your workplace? Are there gender differences ...

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We Need Better Managers, Not More Technocrats

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Digital technology is the biggest agitator of the business world today. Mobile technology, social media, cloud computing, embedded devices, big data, and analytics have radically changed the nature of work and competition.  And digital innovations will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. Technology has tremendous potential to be the engine of increasing human, organizational, and economic prosperity.

However, digital technology is not the true story. Digital transformation is. Fulfilling technology’s potential will require leaders to recreate the way their institutions operate in a world of ...

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When Talent Started Driving Economic Growth

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I came out of a standard Keynesian economics education at Harvard College in 1979. It was remarkably closed: from what I could tell, we read Chicago economists, from whom the supply-side movement arose, exclusively to mock them.

But I graduated into an economy that was couldn’t be explained by applying the tools I had been taught. And within three years of my graduation, unemployment hit 10.8%, inflation 13.5%, and the prime rate 21.5%. It was supposed to be ...

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Xbox Polling and the Future of Election Prediction

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For generations, pollsters have used probability polling (think of the Gallup polls quoted on the nightly news) as their go-to method to forecast the outcomes of elections. But cost increases and concerns about accuracy have called the method into question. A new form of polling called non-probability sampling — opt-in surveys on the internet, prediction markets, and even polls on gaming systems — has emerged as an improvement, and a viable replacement.

First, let’s take a look at probability polling, which ...

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Do Academically Marginal Students Benefit from College? The Data Says Yes.

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A study of Florida high-schoolers whose grades were just good enough for admission to a public university shows that higher education provided significant financial benefits for these students: 8 to 14 years after high school, their earnings were 22% higher than those of peers who hadn’t gone to college, with male students showing the largest gains, says Seth D. Zimmerman of Yale. These benefits outstrip the costs of college attendance, he says.

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Scotland’s Future Is Bright; the UK’s Might Not Be

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In the run up to the Scottish independence referendum, the large-country voices that dominated the international discussion converged on a near consensus that small countries are inferior to larger ones, with worse prospects and higher risks; that the pro-independence movement’s motivation was cultural nationalism and an angry defensiveness against the world; and that independence would do significant damage to an open, liberal international order.

When Alan Greenspan, Paul Krugman, and Niall Ferguson all agree on something, it’s a ...

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