Blog

Health Care Outcomes: When the More Effective Choice Costs More

Posted by:

Better models of care will go a long way toward spurring health care providers to make better choices between increased costs and improved outcomes, Wharton’s Mark Pauly writes.

Continue Reading →

Why the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge Went Viral

Posted by:

The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge has raised millions of dollars toward fighting the disease and spawned millions of videos and shares on social media. Wharton’s Jonah Berger discusses why the campaign went viral.

Continue Reading →

Is the Future of Shopping No Shopping at All?

Posted by:

The Future Will Be Charged to Your Credit Card

Shopping Made Psychic

The New York Times

In a survey on what he terms “predictive shopping,” Harvard Law professor Cass Sustein found that 41% of people would “enroll in a program in which the seller sent you books that it knew you would purchase, and billed your credit card.” That number ...

Continue Reading →

How Watson Changed IBM

Posted by:

Remember when IBM’s “Watson” computer competed on the TV game show “Jeopardy” and won? Most people probably thought “Wow, that’s cool,” or perhaps were briefly reminded of the legend of John Henry and the ongoing contest between man and machine. Beyond the media splash it caused, though, the event was viewed as a breakthrough on many fronts. Watson demonstrated that machines could understand and interact in a natural language, question-and-answer format and learn from their mistakes. This meant ...

Continue Reading →

Great Leadership Isn’t About You

Posted by:

The year 1777 was not a particularly good time for America’s newly formed revolutionary army. Under General George Washington’s command, some 11,000 soldiers made their way to Valley Forge. Following the latest defeat in a string of battles that left Philadelphia in the hands of British forces, these tired, demoralized, and poorly equipped early American heroes knew they now faced another devastating winter.

Yet history clearly records that despite the harsh conditions and lack of equipment that left sentries to stand ...

Continue Reading →

Your Content Strategy Is Also a Recruiting Strategy

Posted by:

I recently asked a friend in California about the drought. “Nothing has changed,” he said. “There may be an emergency, but we’re still watering our lawns.”

There’s a similar crisis in the private sector, and plenty of leaders are approaching it with the same mentality as my friend.

But this time, it’s not the lawns that are drying up; it’s the talent pool.

Much like the drought, there are several factors contributing to this crisis. The first is generational. As Boomers retire, they’re ...

Continue Reading →

Universities Cater to a New Demographic: Boomers

Posted by:

During his years at the University of Virginia, Jerry Reid was, for the most part, a typical busy member of the Class of 2014. He worked hard in his classes, joined a fraternity, was a member of the debating society, played flag football, and cheered for school sports teams.

But in one significant way, Reid was far from typical:  He enrolled in college at the age of 66, receiving his bachelor’s degree this spring at 70. “I have become the man ...

Continue Reading →

Sometimes, Employees Are Right to Worry About Taking Vacation

Posted by:

According to one study, 13% of managers are less likely to promote workers who take all of their vacation time; according to another, employees who take less than their full vacations earn 2.8% more in the subsequent year than their peers who took all of their allotted days, reports the Wall Street Journal. Thus it’s not surprising that 15% of U.S. employees who are entitled to paid vacation time haven’t used any of it in the past year.

Continue Reading →

The Conversation We Should Be Having About Corporate Taxes

Posted by:

The corporate inversion — when a U.S. company takes on the legal identity of foreign subsidiary, usually in order to reduce its taxes — has become about as controversial as corporate finance topics get. President Obama has called such transactions “unpatriotic.” Others have defended them as a way for American companies to stay competitive in the face of a uniquely intrusive tax code.

Harvard Business School’s Mihir Desai and Bill George both fall mostly in the second ...

Continue Reading →

Improving Government Performance, Anticipating Citizens’ Needs

Posted by:

Predictive analytics is quickly becoming a vital tool for governments trying to identify tax evaders or terrorists, to look for the best way to tackle a flu epidemic — and more.

Continue Reading →
Page 1 of 179 12345...»